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Dr. Tim Sesterhenn

Last updated September 12, 2016

RESEARCH

Dr. Tim Sesterhenn

I was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio where I was instilled with a love for nature by my parents, The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau, and Marty Stouffer's Wild America. I got my B.A. in Zoology at Ohio Wesleyan University, where an interest in amphibians and biological research began. I got my Ph.D. at the University of Kentucky studying the effects of different stressors on aquatic damselfly larvae, then spent a few years at Purdue University as a postdoctoral researcher working on computer simulation models of Great Lakes fish. Here at Morningside, I teach Principles of Biology I, Invertebrate Biology, The Science of Climate Change, our departmental Capstone course, and First Year Seminar. Outside of the classroom and lab, I enjoy experiencing the outdoors while playing disc golf.

My research interests are quite diverse. Organisms do not live in a perfect world, and my main interest is how they adjust their lives to deal with assorted stressors. Past research has included work on appendage loss, climate change, low levels of oxygen, predators, prey, competitors, and pollutants, looking at responses in growth, survival, foraging success, behavior, respiration, distribution within the habitat, and life history. Other projects have investigated what drives variable morphology (body shape) of individuals within a population and computer-simulated growth rates of larval fish in the Great Lakes. Methods for these studies have included lab work, field work, and writing computer programs.

If you are a student interested in research, please contact me to join the lab! Future topics include:

- how human-driven changes in the environment and other stressors affect the ecology of invertebrates, especially damselflies

- computer simulation models of population and community dynamics

- drivers and function of variable morphology

In addition to these topics I am developing several other directions and I am open to any ideas from enthusiastic students.

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